Nearly as popular as Pad Thai, spicy, flavorful Drunken Noodles graces the menus of most Thai restaurants. I have finally found a recipe for Pad Thai that makes my dish taste fairly authentic, so I thought it was time to try making Drunken Noodles at home for Day 3 of my March challenge.

The most exciting part of this challenge is that I finally had an excuse to venture to Uwajimaya, often referred to as “the Walmart of Asian supermarkets” in search of some of the ingredients I didn’t have at home.

Uwajimaya was a completely overwhelming experience – finding wide rice noodles was almost as challenging as trying to accurately pronounce Uwajimaya.

How does one find the right rice noodles?!?

How does one find the right rice noodles?!?

The Recipe: I found this recipe on http://www.food.com, and used it due to its good ratings.

Quick Recap: I decided to add some cooked Chinese broccoli to the dish (since I had some in the fridge), I dry fried the tofu, and I doubled the recipe. Otherwise, I followed it pretty much spot-on. Oyster sauce and Thai basil are key.

I've found that dry frying firm tofu makes it taste more like the tofu you find in Thai restaurants

I’ve found that dry frying firm tofu makes it taste more like the tofu you find in Thai restaurants

The Verdict: The drunken noodles came out tasting like a less-greasy version of drunken noodles that you get in a Thai restaurant (good for my health, but maybe less good for their authenticity). Overall, the noodles were tasty, but I don’t think it would hurt to cook them again using a slightly different recipe.

Drunken noodles + stout (because craft beer makes everything taste better)!

Drunken noodles + stout (because craft beer makes everything taste better)!

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